Category Archives: Motoring

2019 Opel Corsa GSi – Irish New Car Review

This week, a family friend but also who I would have considered an inspiration passed away. This was Declan O’Byrne. Declan wrote for the Irish Independent and, more recently, the Roscommon Champion. Declan was a good friend of my father’s throughout school but I remember him as Declan – the motoring journalist. I have fond memories of him pulling up to my house in a brand new press car as I “ooh-ed” and “ah-ed” over his job. I wanted to follow suit so he pointed me in the right direction on how to do so. I don’t think I could have achieved what I have as a motoring journalist without Declan. So here’s to do you Declan, gone but never forgotten. I bid you farewell with a review, that of the 2019 Opel Corsa GSi.

The 2019 Opel Corsa GSi plays the part of being Opel’s hot hatch, until they figure what to do with the OPC name plate. It is apparent from my review of the 2016 Opel Corsa OPC that it was good but far from perfect. The GSi takes what was good about the regular Corsa city hatchback and adds a  bit of spice. It aims to take on the Ford Fiesta ST and the 2019 Volkswagen Polo GTI.From the outside, the Corsa GSi hasn’t changed much at all. It has kept the OPC’s aero body kit and faux-air intake on the bonnet. The optional 18-inch Titan diamond cut alloys (€750) set off the Lava Red (€155) paintwork nicely. The front grill’s “mustache” and wing mirror housing are carbon effect, standard for the GSi. The overall package is unique and reassuring knowing that they haven’t just shrunk the Astra. Out of the Corsa’s close competitors, it definitely looks the best.

Inside, it also remains the same as the OPC. The optional Recaro leather seats (€1,450) are the talking point of this warm hatch. Although they hug you in the tight, country back lane twisties, they weren’t made for comfort. A two hour motorway journey had me thinking twice if they are worth the extra cash over the standard seats. They also add extra inconvenience trying to access the rear seats. You had to slam and tug the whole seat forward before the seat will release and move forward in its rails. And even then, the rear seats aren’t easily accessible.The infotainment system is easy to use. It hooks up to your phone, through Bluetooth, without any hassle. Something Opel can do very well, are easy to use, no nonsense infotainment systems.

The Corsa GSi’s interior is seriously let down by the ergonomics. The infotainment is presented flat on the centre console so you must move your left arm if you want to check the time, see what song is playing, etc. This could be fixed by re-positioning the Navi 4.0 Intellilink 7-inch screen. I didn’t realise the Corsa had one-touch auto windows because you have to hold your finger on the window button for about 2 or 3 seconds before they go up or down automatically.The worst, and most inconvenient part, were the doors. They feel absolutely massive for the size of the car. The whole car measures in at just over 4 metres. I noticed the door size when I was getting in and out of the car in a car park. Even with enough room between me and the next car, I had to squeeze out of the small gap. Otherwise, I may have bumped the door off the car next to me. The climate control could also be revised. I could never get the car the right temperature without the windows fogging up.I can finally sing the 2019 Corsa GSi’s praises out on the open road. It’s reminiscent of my time with the Opel Adam S. The 1.4 petrol’s turbo engine only puts out 150hp and 220Nm but this is all the GSi needs to have fun. The steering’s lightness is weighten up once you leave the city so the 1,200kg car can really let it’s hair down. The gear change is nicely notchy too. Opel have been criticised in the past for this but I feel it works here. You can feel the gears engaging and makes you want to practice your heel-toeing technique.

The OPC’s major setback was the value for money, mainly the running costs. It cost €750 per year to tax and got 10.5l/100km. The GSi is more reasonable. The warm hatch puts out 147g/km of CO2 meaning it’s €390 to tax. Based off the couple of motorway runs and mainly backroad spirited driving I was doing, I averaged 8.3l/100km over 681km. With extras the GSi costs €29,465 with the base price being €24,895. This optioned up price puts it €3,000 less than the OPC was and, I believe, you get a lot more for your money.The 2019 Opel Corsa GSi certainly ticks the right boxes. It’s 150hp is usable on Irish roads, it looks much better than the Volkswagen Polo GTI and all for an, arguably, reasonable price. If you can overlook the interior’s niggles then the Corsa GSi is the perfect city car-cum-backroad hooner for you.

2018 Renault Megane RS – New Car Review Ireland

Any Irish driver will tell you that Irish roads are some of the worst paved roads in the world. Leave Dublin City, find any non-primary road and you’ll be the witness to some absolute shockers. This is where the hot hatch comes into play. It’s purpose is to be a sensible family hatchback that can fit your shopping but also fill the position of being your weekend hooner. Enter, the 2018 Renault Megane R.S. Up against competitors like the Ford Focus RS and Volkswagen Golf R, the Megane RS has some pretty big shoes to fill. However, Renault Sport have produced some absolute bangers (meant in the good sense) in the past and they seemed to have knocked it out of the park this time too.Having had the argument only recently, for me a hot hatch has to be all kinds of bonkers in terms of styling. However, it needs to make sense. Yes, I’m looking at you Honda Civic Type R. The Volkswagen Golf R looks good and is a decent drive, but it’s too normal looking for me. When the regular Megane was released in 2015, I thought it looked great. It was completely different than anything on the road and it remains the same for the Megane R.S. The bulging arches makes it stand out amongst the regular Megane. Finished in Tonic Orange(€975) and with optional satin black 19-inch RS alloys (€350), this hot hatch got A LOT of attention on the road. But it would want to with the Megane RS price starting at €42,995.Instead of a massive spoiler, the Renault has a rear defuser that directs air correctly forcing the car down creating down force (that’s the extent of my tech talk…), the same job as a spoiler. Located in the centre of this defuser, is what looks like a single exhaust but beneath the fake tip are two pipes. This harks back to the previous gen Megane RS with a similar set up. Up front, the R.S retains the brand’s face as found on the likes of the Kadjar, Clio and Captur. Housed on each corner of the front bumper are fog lights in the shape of the RS logo.On the inside, the piece de resistance are the, again optional (€1,500), R.S logo-ed bucket seats. They hug you in all the right places and are surprisingly comfortable on long motorway journeys. However, Renault’s R-Link is just as annoying as ever. It’s slow, laggy and filled with unnecessary sub menus. This presser had the optional Bose sound system which, despite being a €600 option, was quite tinny. To make up for this, the 1.8 turbo’s exhaust sound is pumped throughout the cabin through the speakers. Maybe just turn off the radio and let this serenade you.Out on the country roads, the Megane really comes into its own. As found on the baby Megane GT, the RS has 4Control, which is Renault’s four wheel steering system. At speeds up to 80km/h in Sport and Race mode (60km/h in other modes), the front and rear wheels turn in the opposite direction of each other. This makes the car nimble around the tight and twisting corners. While at higher speeds, the wheels turn in the same direction. This means you can throw the R.S into a corner and keep the power on going through because the wheels are adding extra grip.The 1.8 turbo petrol has a peak of 280hp and 390Nm. Helping to get this power to the wheels is a 6-speed EDC auto (Don’t freak out, there’s 6-speed manual also available). When I look at the Volkswagen Golf R, having driven the manual, I can’t see myself owning one unless it was DSG. The same goes for the R.S. The auto lets you concentrate on handling that much power while it takes care of munching through the gears. But, rather than letting it do all the work, the large metal steering wheel mounted-paddles let you decide when you want to shift up or down.My problem with these is that Renault insist on not putting the audio controls on the steering wheel, rather on a stand alone unit mounted under the downshift paddle. This results in the paddle only going half way down the steering wheel meaning that if you wanted to downshift mid corner, you end up turning up the radio.

Five driving modes  are available at the touch of a button; Comfort, Neutral, Sport, Race and Perso. Comfort, Neutral and Perso (Personal) are all self explanatory. It’s Sport and Race mode that are worth talking about. In Race mode, the steering tightens up, the throttle response is a lot quicker and the exhaust farts are A LOOOT fartier. The main difference between Race and Sport mode is that, Race turns off traction control. For this time of year with the greasy Irish roads, Sport mode was just perfect. The 245/35 Bridgestone Potenza tyres gripped perfectly even in these greasy conditions.

While the R.S’s chassis is not the Cup Chassis option, it is still rigid. But nicely so. It’s comfortable on the terribly paved roads of South West Ireland but neat enough to negotiate these roads without body roll. However, it’s not all perfect. I noticed slight understeer when pushing it on in larger, swooping bends. The Trophy version of the R.S is on the way with an extra 20hp, bringing it up to 300hp. Knowing Renault, this will iron out some of the regular R.S’s imperfections.

As for running costs, the Renault is €570 to tax for the year. While this is reasonable, the average fuel consumption of 11.9l/100km (23.7mpg) over roughly 900km isn’t as such. The best I managed to get was 10l/100km (28.2mpg) on a motorway run. Archie‘s, my MINI Cooper S, 30mpg doesn’t seem so bad after all. I would slightly forgive it if it had a bigger tank; 50l means you become all too familiar with that green pump.The Megane RS wouldn’t be a Renault without a slight hiccup here or there. The R.S, yeah, it breaks down… While out shooting, thanks to David Olsthoorn for the insane shots, we ran into some bother. As we were leaving, a parking brake warning light started blinking and beeping. Turning off and on the car again sorted this but left some doubt in my mind. I then noticed that, at night, the blind spot warning dots in the side mirrors would blink randomly. These concerns aren’t unique to me. The car has been on and off fleet quite a bit over it’s period with it letting other driver’s down. It seems Renault do have a reputation to maintain.If the Renault’s niggles were sorted out, the 2018 Renault Megane R.S would be the near perfect hot hatch on sale today. But these concerns are big and aren’t uncommon on RenaultSport models, past and present. However, it’s just the right amount of insane to make me part with my cash over the Volkswagen Golf R and Honda Civic Type R. If I were you though, I’d definitely wait for the Trophy.

 

2018 Volkswagen Amarok V6 Aventura – Irish New Car Review

A car is more than just a car now. It’s a lifestyle choice. As an example, I’m currently trying to sell my MINI Cooper S because I now do more motorway miles rather than back road jaunts, unfortunately. So now I need a frugal diesel. As for the 2018 Volkswagen Amarok Aventura, someone who buys this is more likely to be the outdoorsy type, lives in the country and needs to haul large loads a lot. This is why the Amarok is in my dream garage.When I picked up the Amarok Aventura, I immediately smirked. This was down to the Indium Grey Matte paintwork. Originally I thought that it had been inspired by an early 2000s supercar, in today’s terms that would be considered tacky. However, the colour grew on me as the week went on. The Amarok gets so much attention, on the road and parked up. I brought it to Cars and Coffee, where I parked it in the far corner of the car park. Even then, it attracted crowds. Although it looks menacing and rowdy, people still have a soft spot for it.Not only does it look good, but being a pick up, it’s practical too. Conveniently, I was moving house the same week. I managed to fit my stuff, along with my two housemates boxes between the loading bed and rear seats of the Amarok. While this might be convenient for you, your friends will definitely take advantage and use you and your pick-up for those dreaded Ikea trips…

But for more regular use, the Amarok isn’t as useful as you’d hope. As standard, the loading bay is uncovered. While some rivals offer a basic cover, Volkswagen don’t. However, if you are a buyer knowing that it will be used mainly around cities, there are plenty of options of covering for the rear.Inside, the Amarok is still a Volkswagen Commercial product. Hard, tough and black plastics line the interior and the 6.3 inch, non-touchscreen infotainment is far from that found in the likes of the 2018 Volkswagen Touareg.The 8-speed DSG automatic is mated to the 3.0 litre V6 diesel. This is my favourite improvement to the Amarok range. No, it isn’t frugal with an average of 9.5l/100km but with 550Nm and 224hp, there is enough poke for what the Amarok is made for. I also have a reputable source that can confirm that the manual V6 is just as fun as a Golf GTI, albeit in a different way. And, I can confirm that the Amarok, even with the 4Motion four wheel drive system, can drift…For all of the reasons above, the Amarok has a special place in my heart and in my future garage. Personally, I have no need for a pick-up but the Amarok V6 has so much appeal. However, at a shade over €60,000 for this particular Aventura specced Amarok, I would also consider its rivals. These include the Toyota Hilux, Nissan Navara and Mercedes X-Class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018 Skoda Superb Laurin & Klement – Irish New Car Review

Anyone who is into 70’s, 80’s and 90’s classics and modern classics will find it hard not to be intrigued by trim lines. Yes, hear me out. We see Ford Cortinas, Mitsubishi Galants and Saab 9000’s around Ireland and find them fascinating with their corduroy cloth seats and simple, but at the time, futuristic features. Embracing them in all their period-correct glory. But we have been missing out on these “prestige” models of everyday cars in recent years. However, Skoda have kept with it and have achieved the ultimate luxury executive car replacement, the 2018 Skoda Superb Laurin & Klement.

2018 Skoda Superb Laurin & Klement

Laurin and Klement, or L&K, was an auto, motorbike and bike manufacturer founded in 1895 in the Czech Republic. Today, L&K is Skoda’s top spec trim on the Octavia and Superb. As for the Skoda Superb, it adds driver select mode with adaptive suspension, rear heated seats, electronically opening and closing boot lid and ambient lighting. This mightn’t sound like it is worth the €43,895 price tag the 2018 Superb L&K commands but it would be hard to get this value for money from its competition.

It’s all on the interior

I’m a sucker for brown leather. It makes any car 100 times better, in my opinion. The Superb is no exception, especially combined with Candy White paintwork on the outside. The Comfort seats impressed me from the moment I slouched into them when I collected the car. I drove a Skoda Superb Sportline and Volkswagen Arteon back-to-back a couple of months ago. This resulted in the Superb winning. But what impressed me most, other than the 1,100km range on one tank of diesel, was the comfort of the saloon on the motorway. So considering the Sportline has firmer suspension, you can only imagine how much more serene my hours spent on the M7 were this time round. Two round trips from Dublin to Limerick and back were helped eased by the 9.2-inch Columbus Infotainment-capable Apple CarPlay and Android Auto System.I must admit, I pulled the short straw everytime it came to driving the Superb. I would much rather have spent the time lounged in the rear, stretching my legs out in front of me. The 2018 Skoda Superb does space so well. Although I’ve driven almost every variant of the Superb at this stage, for some reason the Superb L&K felt a lot larger. This was evident when parking and negotiating tight streets and lanes.The same 2.0TDI 150hp lump that I drove in the Sportline and Arteon was in the L&K. Although, just because of what the L&K is, I would spec mine with either the 190hp version of the 2.0TDI or the 2.0TSI 280hp, also found in the Superb Sportline. I noticed a slight lack of power in the 150hp when pulling away from toll booths on the motorway and overtaking. However you can’t argue with the 6.3l/100km (45MPG) over 1,110km. Having the 7-speed DSG may have compromised this.A simple question to ask would be is the executive car dead? Definitely not, no. The Audi A4 and 2018 Audi A6 are very good offerings from the brand, as is the 2018 Mercedes E-Class. But, while the 2018 Skoda Superb Laurin and Klement might be not be as elegant in every way as these, it’s people like me who would rather one over the E-Class or A4. I don’t go for a certain brand, I go for value for money and, boy, does the Skoda Superb L&K offer that.

2018 Opel Grandland X – New Car Review

Recently, I wrote an article. When I say article, it was more like a rant. Said rant is about popularisation of SUVs. In particular, fast or “Super” SUVs. From it, you can tell that I’m not a fan of the SUV craze but I have no shame in admitting that there are a few good ones on the market. Take the Skoda Kodiaq for example. For its price, the space, comfort and equipment you get is hard to beat. Except, for 2018 Irish motor journalists chose the Peugeot 3008 over it. This leads me to the 2018 Opel Grandland X. Now being owned by PSA (owners of Citroen and Peugeot), the Grandland X is technically a re-bodied Peugeot 3008. But, why should, or shouldn’t, you choose it over its French brother?Up front, the Opel Grandland X shares the Opel face. Centred on the black grill is the Opel logo with chrome trim flowing out into the LED Adaptive Lighting, a €1,250 option. Mimicking this on the lower grill houses more chrome trim bits and a black sensor ready for Adaptive Cruise Control. In this two-tone Dark Ruby Red with Black roof, the Grandland X looks closely related to its French Cousin, the 2018 Peugeot 3008.

What About Inside the Opel Grandland X?

Inside, the SUV is well thought out and not overly complicated. The 8-inch screen housing the infotainment system sits centre stage. Under the screen, the system is old school because it still uses buttons and knobs to control it. I’m very used to having to search within modern infotainment systems to find the Bluetooth settings in order to pair my phone. This wasn’t the case for the Opel Grandland X. Once you turn on Bluetooth on my phone, I was able to connect to the system straight away. This took some time to getting used to.The Grandland and I spent a lot of motorway kilometres together. The cabin was impressively quiet, on par with the 2018 Mazda CX-5. Although while the CX-5 felt stable and comfortable on the motorway, the Grandland felt a little unsettled. While it won’t win any awards for being the most agile car on sale in Ireland, the 1.2 3-cylinder petrol engine is one to be commended. Even on the motorway runs, I averaged 6.9l/100km. At this, the engine didn’t feel insufficient power-wise. The 130hp and 230Nm could overtake with ease. While you might see a better return on your fuel economy in a diesel for motorway dominant journeys, you wouldn’t see much benefit between city runs and motorway jaunts in the diesel. The 1.2 petrol gives you the best of both worlds.

Space?

Plenty of space is on offer up front for the driver and passenger and this is transferred to the rear also. I’m just over 6-foot and had ample head and leg room in the rear. In the boot, 514l is on offer. Collapsing the rear seats jumps this up to 1,652l. This is compared to 521l in the Skoda Karoq and 520l in the Peugeot 3008.On the most basic trim level, the Opel Grandland X SC comes standard with a 7-inch IntelliLink touch screen infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, 17-inch alloys and rear parking sensors. With prices starting from €27,995, it is €1,400 more than the Peugeot 3008 and €280 more than the Skoda Karoq.While the 2018 Opel Grandland X might be a Peugeot 3008 not too far beneath the skin, it’s still one to consider when looking at buying in this segment. The standard kit on the SC trim is enough to attract you to your local Opel dealership alone. The 1.2 petrol engine is a cracker for the size of the Opel Grandland X. Admittedly, I thought it was going to struggle on the motorway but I was pleasantly surprised.

2018 Lamborghini Urus

The SUV Craze HAS to Stop!

There’s no denying that the world, not just Ireland, has become obsessed with SUVs. SUVs used to be seen as a utility vehicle before it was seen as a luxury car, hence the name Sports Utility Vehicle. Morphing from a Toyota Landcruiser or Land Rover Defender into the shape of a Land Rover Range Rover or Bentley Bentayga.

The latter is a new comer onto the scene. I could hack the likes of the Hyundai Tuscon, Ireland’s best “selling” SUV, or Nissan Qashqai. But, once Bentley came out with the concept to the Bentayga, it seemed like every car manufacturer needed an SUV in their line-up.I felt the need to write this piece after seeing that Lotus have a plan for an SUV in the works. In September 2017, Lotus was bought over by Geely, the owners of Volvo. The SUV will, seemingly, have the underpinnings of a Volvo SUV, probably the XC60 or XC90, but will also be engaging to drive. This sounds rather like the 2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio. A snarling Bi-Turbo V6 puts out 510hp out of the four wheel drive SUV. This same V6 is seen in the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio.

But not only is it Lotus and Alfa who are “answering customers needs”. Porsche have the Macan, Rolls Royce have the soon-to-be-released Cullinan, Lamborghini have the hideous Urus and Land Rover even added an extra Range Rover to the line-up, the Range Rover Velar.

Credit to AutoCar.co.uk

Stop Buying the SUV!

It has to stop! I am definitely a fan of fast estates, who isn’t? The 2018 SEAT Leon Cupra is one to be commended. It retains the same agile handling as the hot hatch Volkswagen Golf R on which it’s based. Right up to the Daddy of Audis, the Audi RS6. A quick estate makes so much sense on so many levels. While the SUV craze may be the replacement for the hot estate, I just can’t get behind it. Crossovers, SUVs or Jeeps, whatever you want to call it, should be left for people who really need them. Let’s go back to the stone age and leave them as being utility vehicles and 4x4s. Do Jim or Mary down the road need that 2018 Nissan Qashqai to drop the kids to school or do the weekly shop? Similarly, will you welcome a 2018 Lamborghini Urus at your local Cars and Coffee event in a couple of years’ time? I for one, won’t. In the words of Helen Lovejoy, “Won’t somebody please think of the children?!”

2018 SEAT Leon ST Cupra Review – New Car Review

Since Volkswagen bought SEAT and Skoda, they have been smart about things. In Ireland, the Skoda Octavia RS petrol doesn’t have a four wheel drive option because it may deter buyers away from the Volkswagen Golf R. But you can have a four wheel drive Octavia RS diesel model. The Golf R comes in two doors and four doors but no estate, unlike some other countries in Europe. So what if you do want a fast estate, what is on offer from VW? I introduce to you the 2018 SEAT Leon ST Cupra.The underpinnings of the Leon Cupra is the Golf R. The same four wheel drive system and the same 300hp, 380Nm 2.0TSI petrol engine. But, instead of a 7-speed DSG, the Cupra only gets 6 gears. With a kerb weight of 1,470kg, this 4.5m long quick estate gets you to 100km/h from a standstill in just 4.9 seconds thanks to launch control, quick indeed.I have always thought that SEAT is a sleeker and more compact looking alternative to its cousins. Its lines are sexier, paying homage to its Spanish history. This is no different for the 2018 Cupra ST. Painted in Mystery Blue, this estate has a masculine and angular face with the fog light surrounds and the lower bumper also packing in straight cut lines. The wing mirrors, I think, make the design. Again, they are pronounced and angular but with SEAT’s Matt Black Pack option box ticked, this €361 option adds Matt Black wing mirror housing, Cupra lettering and front grill. Also part of the pack are the 19-inch alloys. It all ties together in a very tidy package.Stepping down into the Leon Cupra ST and you are comforted by Black Alcantara sports seats with Carbon Fibre-look fabric inserts. They are very comfortable for a sport seat, even in the rear. Rear passengers have decent enough room but definitely not on par with the Skoda Octavia RS. The Infotainment is the same that is seen across the SEAT range. The 8-inch touchscreen is a great system in the Ibiza but I think they could have done something a little more with it for the Leon, especially the Cupra. It includes Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and Mirror Link but you’ll need to be hooked up to these if you want to use Sat Nav. I do like the fact that SEAT have used a discreet “4-Wheel-Drive” badge near the gear shifter rather than the big, agricultural-looking 4MOTION that Volkswagen use on the 2018 Volkswagen Golf R. Another criticism I have is the abundance of road noise. It is especially noticeable at any speed over 50km/h. The 19-inch alloys don’t help with this but the lack of sound deadening plays a part too.Out on the road the Cupra is comparable to the Volkswagen Golf R, naturally. Even with the extra 40kg and length of 27cm, the Cupra ST still feels just as nimble and tight as the hatchback Golf R. Thanks to the four wheel drive, you can drive the Cupra into a corner with full power on knowing you’ll come out the otherside without hesitation, wheel spin and all the grip the hot estate can manage to gather. A fun party trick you can show your friends is the launch control. This catapults you from 0-100km/h in just 4.9 seconds. But a party trick is all it is, I don’t really see the point of it. Still, you should definitely show everyone you can!So for €46,465, is the SEAT Leon Cupra ST worth a look in? Definitely. Although I don’t think it has the same appeal as the Golf R, it shouldn’t be over looked if you are after a fast estate. It sits into a niche sector, one that the Ford Focus ST and the 100hp-less Renault Megane GT sit in too. Although we don’t get the Volkswagen Golf R estate, don’t think you’re just settling for the SEAT Leon Cupra ST, it’s definitely one capable car.

2018 Renault Captur Review

Somewhere in history, car manufacturers in Ireland started realising that young buyers want something fun, quirky and different than the usual car purchase. This lead to smaller and more affordable models in manufacturer’s line-ups. But, also to retro designs like the MINI Cooper, Fiat 500 and Volkswagen Beetle. But, pair this quirky, funky styling technique to the modern day fad of the SUV and you will get the 2018 Renault Captur.The Renault Captur is nothing new to the French manufacturer’s line-up now being on sale since 2013. Having received a makeover in 2017, the Clio-based Renault Captur facelift crossover is one that should not be overlooked. From the outside, the tall yet equally hunkered down stance of the 2018 Captur ticks the boxes of a young person’s SUV. Finished in Amethyst with Platinum roof, purple with a silver roof to you and I, the Captur’s looks definitely tickled my fancy. The facelift adds a more grown-up and muscular front end to the B-segment SUV.The Captur is based off the Renault Clio so, naturally, it shares some of its components. Most of that being evident on the interior. In Signature S Nav trim, the Captur gets a 7-inch touchscreen with Renault’s R-Link infotainment system. You can read from my previous reviews of R-Link that it’s not the best however it has been seriously improved for the Captur. First of all, my phone actually paired with this one and worked every time. It’s easy to navigate and with sat nav from TomTom, it’s well equipped. Black leather seats also come as standard on Signature S Nav trim. These are comfortable, look good and come with bum warmers. Mmm, toasty!Although, the quality of the finish was still what Renault is recognised for. Scratchy plastics galore, even if the two tone dash did look good. Also, from the rear bench was an annoying creak that wouldn’t go away. On the passenger seat, the button for the heated eats, or at least the fake button in its place, had fallen into the base of the seat leaving just a hole. Not a great result quality-wise for a car with less than 5,000km on the clock.Also carrying on from my review of the 2018 Renault Megane, you will get my hatred for Nissan Renault’s 1.5 dCi engine. To my dread, this Captur was fitted with it. Although, it made a good combo on this occasion. My week of mostly urban and suburban commuting translated to a fuel economy of 7.2l/100km. This just backs up my point of my lack of a need for a diesel. So if you don’t do many motorway miles, consider opting for the TCe 90hp 3-cylinder petrol. Although, strangely, this is not available in the Signature S Nav, only diesels are available in the highest trim level.

The cabin was averagely refined in terms of road noise and engine noise but the comfortable seats made up for this. Steering was good from the tall crossover but body roll was present so don’t be getting any ideas. Although my test car sat on 17-inch “Emotion” alloys, ride comfort was good.Boot space equals 377 litres with the seats up and 1,235l with them down, taking advantage of the two tier boot floor too. Taller rear passengers might not be the most comfortable when it comes to head room but if they have long legs, they need not worry.

Overall, the Captur is good buy. Comparing it to the 2018 Opel Crossland X I tested a couple of weeks ago, the Captur is a no brainer. It is miles ahead in terms of refinement, looks and drivability. In Signature S Nav trim, this 2018 Renault Captur will set you back from €27,390. Spec it up correctly and you’ll be one happy urbanite. Renault, you did good!

2018 Subaru Forester Review – New Car Review

I’m a newbie when it comes to CVT gearboxes. My first experience of one was in my recent test car, the 2018 Subaru Forester. In Ireland, the Forester costs from €36,995 which makes it a much pricier alternative to the 2018 Mazda CX-5 and 2018 Nissan X-Trail. However, both of the latter SUVs can be had with a regular, automatic gearbox and having experienced the CX-5 with its 6-speed auto, it’s rather good. But Subaru has always been a bit out there so instead of giving us a trusty automatic, they have given us a CVT. *Deep sigh* OK, let’s do this.

CVT stands for Continuously Variable Transmission. While it is an automatic, it doesn’t have gears but rather steps or stages. Instead of gears, or cogs, there are pulleys. One turned by the engine and the other pulled by the rest of the transmission to the wheels. This transcribes to a seamless and smooth gear change but, when driven like any other car, the engine uses most of the rev range before changing up a gear. This is annoying not only because of the high revs but this translates to a 9.6l/100km fuel economy figure. So in order for you to drive the Forester as Subaru has intended, you must drive at a snail’s pace.

But the Subaru isn’t just all about the CVT. Thanks to its EyeSight feature, it has one of the best adaptive cruise control systems I’ve used. Eyesight is how Subaru say “safety”. It acts as lane recognition and emergency brake assist also. By monitoring other motorists around you, the binocular-like sensors at the top of the windscreen help to keep you out of trouble.

The Forester, back in the day, was a boxy, quirky Japanese estate. Now, keeping up with trends, it is more of an SUV. The exterior’s tall, awkward design translates to great head room in the front and rear and a boot space of at least 505l and up to 1,565l with the seats flat. A decent sized glovebox and a huge centre console cubby hole mean that the Forester has plenty of space all round. The heated leather seats mean that motorway journeys were comfortable and not to be dread.

Taking the SUV off road with X-Mode means that this family practical package can become, not hard core but, off road capable. Understandably, there are very few places where it is free reign for you to tear around in your off roader but I have my spots and I took the 2018 Subaru Forester “soft-roading”. While I found it capable here, I didn’t challenge it. However, I was informed by Subaru when I dropped the Forester back that when they did the official launch, the off road course instructors that navigated the journalists around said that it was just as capable as their Land Rover Discovery 1 and 2s. Although I find this hard to believe, I wasn’t there so I have to take their word for it.

Overall, the Forester is a decent package. Coming in at €38,995 for this 150hp, 198Nm Boxer petrol engine with the CVT, it is well equipped. I would recommend the Eyesight safety system, for sure. What I would not recommend is the CVT. For your own sanity, until Subaru discover the conventional automatic gearbox, opt for the 6-speed manual.

2018 Jeep Wrangler Front

2018 Jeep Wrangler Review – New Car Review

A car is very much a lifestyle accessory. SUVs and Crossovers are predominantly used by families with practicality at the top of their list. Two seater sports cars, like the Mazda MX-5, is bought by someone who doesn’t take life too seriously. Someone who has no belongings that need to be carried around and wants to look good on those couple of, and rare, Summer days in Ireland. Where in Ireland does the 2018 Jeep Wrangler fit in so?

A Quick Jeep Wrangler History Lesson

The Jeep Wrangler’s ancestors date back to the Willys MB. The MB was brought about in 1941 for American troops to use in World War II. After the war, Willys trademarked the name Jeep and began to manufacture the Jeep for everyday use naming it the CJ – Civilian Jeep. Right up until the early 1980’s the CJ was doing well for the brand. It was an icon that everyone knew what it was and what it was about. But, the recession meant that the American market wanted something lighter and more fuel efficient yet still a “Go Anywhere” 4×4. The Jeep Cherokee was introduced and the CJ was briefly axed. After Jeep made their money off the Cherokee it was time to bring back the CJ, but with a new name. And so, the Wrangler was born. Fast forward to 2018, and three Wrangler generations later, the Jeep Wrangler is one tough cookie stooped in history. The 2018/2019 fourth generation Jeep Wrangler is due in Ireland at the end of this year. I couldn’t not let myself get a go in the third generation before it disappeared so here we are today.

A Lifestyle Vehicle You Say?

I still stand by my point of the Jeep Wrangler being a lifestyle vehicle. This is evident to any regular punter simply by looking at the spec sheet. A 200hp and 460Nm 2.8 four-cylinder diesel powers this almost 2,000kg selectable four wheel drive 4×4 around. Shifting through the gears is a single clutch 5-speed automatic returning a real world average of 11.9l/100Km. Combining these history book figures with an abundance of road and wind noise, the 2018 Jeep Wrangler is not for the faint hearted.

2018 Jeep Wrangler Rear

Thankfully I am not faint hearted because I utterly love the Wrangler. It’s a raw, no frills off roader amongst a sea of soft roaders pretending to be something they are not. While I didn’t get the opportunity to do any hard core off roading, I did take the Wrangler to a small off road circuit. It handled it as if it was just a rough bit of road. There was so much more to give from the Wrangler that I felt I was just teasing it. One of the “techy” bits offered by the Jeep is hill ascent control. Think of this is as cruise control for going down steep declines. I found this feature handy in the 2017 Volkswagen Touareg.

What About Everyday Use? 

But trying to use the 2018 Jeep Wrangler as an everyday car is like wearing a pair of stilettos to climb The Sugar Loaf. You’ll wince and make up curse words that you didn’t think were possible as you try to negotiate any sort of street that’s narrower than 50 metres wide. For a four seater, the Wrangler is awkwardly big. This is only one of the indicators that it was built for the American market.

But in saying this, in the right environment it’s versatile. The rear section of the roof and the two panels above the driver can come off in a matter of minutes, with two people. Starts to drizzle? Not to worry, the Alpine sub woofer in the boot is waterproof. There are two rubber stoppers on the bonnet which are there to protect the glass windscreen when you fold it down, just to add to the outdoorsy experience. The quirkiness doesn’t stop there. The only option available here in Ireland is that of metallic paint, otherwise it comes standard in White. Homage is paid to the Willys MB all around the Jeep. On the bottom right hand corner of the windscreen is a silhouette of an Willys MB, same as on each of the 18-inch alloys. The horn is the best though. I should have added a sound clip – YouTube it!

Would I Buy One?

When you break down each component of the Wrangler, it doesn’t make much sense. What, with a 5-speed auto, an average fuel consumption of 11.9l/100km and a boot space of just 142 litres. But, put it all together, mix it up, cook it at 180 degrees for 25 minutes and you’ve got a car that is more than worthy of a spot in your garage at your lake house in Lake Tahoe. Unfortunately it costs the guts of at least €53,250. Still, I want to go on an adventure. Now, where did I leave the keys?

2018 Jeep Wrangler Front